This winter has seen 8,000,000,000 cubic feet of snow in Boston, enough to fill Gillette Stadium 90 times. In order to deal with all of this snow the city has spent $35,000,000 on snow removal covering almost 244,00 miles of plowed streets. But when snow is continually plowed aside, neighborhoods soon run out of space to store it. The lack of decentralized snow lots means that this excess snow is often trucked all the way across town to large “snow farms.” With so much snow, the tough question becomes WHERE to put it, and WHO will remove it?

SNOW AS AN ASSET
If we change the perception of snow, we can begin to view it as one of Boston’s environmental, financial, and cultural assets. Incentivizing private collection and storage of snow can reduce the burden on the city, and places responsibility on local institutions.

NEW COLLECTION MODES
Changing the way we collect and remove snow is key to streamlining the process and maximizing efforts. Boston’s unique population gives it a distinct advantage. Can Boston’s plethora of Institutions (universities, hospitals, corporations) support the effort?

PUTTING SNOW TO WORK!
Boston can leverage the latent coolness of snow to provide cooling in the hot summer months! Snow-cooling can help reduce energy usage and cooling bills in homes, schools, and labs. District-based systems will strengthen a decentralized power grid, a key component of a more resilient city.